Non-PROFIT | WILDLIFE CONFLICT MITIGATION

Project GRIPH

Guarding the Respective Interests of Predators and Humans

 

We specialize in non-lethal wildlife conflict mitigation to help build a bridge between rural communities and our wildlife neighbors. We train and deploy range riders with our methods in the western United States, helping humans co-thrive with our environment.

 

Want to get involved? Join the pack and give back! Need help with wildlife conflict? Learn more & book a consult today.

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Guarding the respective interests of
predators & Humans

Protection & Connection

MAKE A DONATION

Your support directly contributes to keeping our team of range riders on the ground, so that we may pursue our mission to help animals and humans co-thrive together on the landscape. Your donation helps support wolves and other animals in the wild, as well as the ranching families we aim to serve. 

JOIN OUR TEAM

Inspired to become a range rider? We train, equip, and deploy range riders across the western United States with our non-lethal methods. Individuals must be interested in both protecting large carnivores and the livelihoods of ranching families. We accept & review applications on a rolling basis.

MITIGATION SERVICES

Discover how our non-lethal methods can teach animals to behave in ways that do not negatively impact your interests. Our team can help you co-thrive with the wildlife around you with aversive conditioning methods. Consultations offered in Washington, U.S.A. and western states.

ADOPT A HORSE

At Project GRIPH, our horses are critical members of our range riding team and most have been rescued from slaughter. We are honored to provide them a permanent safe home and enriching experiences in the wild. 

Your recurring donation helps provide a great quality of life for our horse family long-term. 

The namesake for Project GRIPH is Griph himself, the snowy white horse Daniel rescued from slaughter in 2010. Meet Griph and a few of the horses from our family below!

Griph

Our namesake, Quarterhorse Arab, the fastest horse on the planet

Raven

Loves to run, Morgan Arab, known for sneaking a snack on-the-go

NEHANA

Youngest on the team, Quarterhorse, the princess of the bunch

MOON

Father of Nehana, Quarterhorse stallion, has an excellent mustache

LEARN TO Co-THRIVE

Wildlife Conflict Mitigation & Education

We assist individuals, communities, and organizations within the western United States using our non-lethal wildlife conflict mitigation methods. From range riding to various environmental and physical deterrent tools, our ever-growing toolbox of methods can help you with your wildlife conflict needs.

 Project GRIPH offers educational programs for your classroom or organization in the western United States. Our standardized Range Riding School is currently in development. Learn more about our educational offerings and how you can join the movement to help build a bridge between human communities and our animal neighbors.

What Drives Us

Our Mission

  TO SAFEGUARD ANIMALS, VALUES, AND THE ENVIRONMENT USING CONSERVATION, EDUCATION AND CONNECTION.   

Project GRIPH is a non-profit based in Washington state, USA. We are dedicated to using non-lethal wildlife conflict mitigation techniques in the western region to help animals learn to thrive on a landscape that is ever-changing with human activity. We believe that as humans, we have a responsibility to live respectfully with our wildlife neighbors. We aim to create connection and build bridges between human communities and our wildlife neighbors, to help us all co-thrive with our environment.

Active Conservation Tours (ACT Rides)

Become a range rider for the day and be a part of the solution to help humans + animals co-thrive together!

Out in wolf country of Washington state, you will hear, track, and see wild animals, as well as connect with ranchers and learn about their work and lifestyle.

By joining us on an ACT Ride, hosted by our global organization GRIPH, you will become a positive reason for rural America to have wolves on the landscape. You also are directly helping support Project GRIPH – the cost of your tour contributes to paying the wages of our team of range riders and care for our animals out in the field.

Ride With Us

The Impact of Your ACT Ride

  • You are helping build a bridge with connection, compassion, and communication, between rural and urban America
  • You are helping create a positive reason for rural America to have wolves on the landscape
  • You are creating a revenue stream to pay for the wages of range riders, and thus, allowing on the ground non-lethal wildlife conflict mitigation efforts to continue

IN THE MEDIA

Range Rider | The Film

WATCH THE TRAILER

Range Rider, a short film by Wild Confluence Media, is a powerful introduction to the work of Project GRIPH. Please contact us if you would like to host a film screening to help spread our story. You can watch and listen to more work of Project GRIPH in Press

 

TESTIMONIALS

Reflections from Ranchers

We truly and deeply care for ranchers and their families, and it is an honor to serve you and our rural community.

sTEVE, WASHIINGTON RANCHER

“Daniel Curry has been working for me for 10 years. He genuinely loves what he does and he is good at it. He is my Range Rider of choice because when he is on my range
the cattle rest easy and the wolves learn to hunt their natural prey and leave my cattle alone. His methods are effective and my losses to depredation by wolf are down when he is watching my range.”

JERRY, WASHINGTON RANCHER

“Mr. Curry is unique within the highly charged subject of Gray Wolf Reintroduction. He is respectful of the perspective of both the advocate and the livestock owner. He recognizes a balanced middle ground for coexistence is necessary. Coexistence requires a combination of understanding ranch activities, livestock behavior, rancher-predator interactions, and the local topography…Mr. Curry’s valuable contributions have been knowledgeable, dedicated, trustworthy and courteous with a sound work ethic. Daniel takes every opportunity to proactively reduce potential predator conflict.”